jump to navigation

Break in the Chain – Camel Guest Post December 3, 2009

Posted by Jason in Daily PM.
Tags: ,
add a comment

No matter how much we stress communication, there will always be a breakdown or two somewhere in the process. Despite the sometimes dire consequences, we accept that humans make errors and account for this by establishing procedures and setting standards.  MORE…

Follow Through – Camel Guest Post October 20, 2009

Posted by Jason in Daily PM.
Tags: ,
add a comment

One of the greatest frustrations that any manager can experience is that of giving an instruction, only to have it not properly or completely carried out.  There is a degree of trust implicit in any human interaction, but in the workplace, there are explicit rules for accountability.  How do you handle situations like this?  MORE…

Project Contracts & Conflicts April 13, 2009

Posted by Jason in Insider's View Relapses.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

Those of us that have been in the workforce for at least a few years likely have become familiar with various methods of conflict identification and resolution. Most of us are fortunate enough to rarely, if ever, have encountered significant conflict during a project. Those who have, whether with a co-worker or client, can attest that it is a very unpleasant experience. I have not yet had to resolve a dispute with attorneys or legal proceedings, but with decades left in my career, I would bet that such a situation awaits. I will do everything I can up until that point to avoid such circumstances. (more…)

Intangible Project Parameters March 5, 2009

Posted by Jason in Insider's View Relapses.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

All of us are familiar with the three sides of project management balance—time, money, and performance. Without a means of measuring and managing each of these aspects of a project, it is doomed to some degree of failure. Since budget and schedule are easy to quantify, they provide a solid yardstick against which the project’s progress can be easily monitored. But the remaining criterion—performance, alternatively called things like deliverables, scope, or quality—can encompass a host of tangible and intangible parameters that may be more difficult to track. Unfortunately for the engineering manager, however, those intangibles are likely some of the most important of the client’s requirements. (more…)